Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Problem Solving-- ABCdarian

Aaron is the eldest. He is twelve. He loves
Baseball. His problem is he has to babysit
Corinne his younger sister. Corinne is five and she
Demands his complete attention, she cries
Every time he tries to practice with
Frank his younger brother in the backyard.
Garth the family Doberman
Howls competing for notice, making
It impossible to focus. Garth sometimes
Jumps and nips Frank in the butt as he tries to catch the ball, this
Keeps Aaron quite busy.
Let’s just say
Multi-tasking is not Aaron’s strong suit.
Now Aaron’s
Only hope of getting good at baseball is to dream up a
Plan that will keep Corinne and Garth busy so he and Frank can practice. He has to think
Quickly. He grins. Nearby a
Rope
Swing sways in the old oak
Tree, rubbing against the branches and swishing
Under the greenery. Corinne, I’ll buy you a
Vanilla ice-cream cone and I’ll
Wager a chew bone to Garth to see who can keep quiet the longest.
X-ing, his fingers behind his back Aaron reaches down to pick up a stick. Garth instantly
Yields. Fetch, Garth. Corinne plays with Garth, Aaron's practice resumes in the clever
Zone.

Jealousy

Jealousy’s best friend is Suspicion.
She has rights, perceives your weakness
and is married to Envy.
She distrusts everyone
their children are Greed
Anxiety
Bitterness
Self-doubt
Fear.


**Nonet

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Letters to a Prisoner by Connie D.

Letters to a PrisonerLetters to a Prisoner by Cornelia "Connie D" DeDona

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Amazon and Kindle



A Survivor speaks out!



Required reading at Habilitat- a drug rehab in Hawaii



Honorable Mention in Poetry at the 2011 New York Book Festival!!



Outstanding look! A unique perspective from a Mom into the mind of the enabler. Free Yourself and the Addict!







View all my reviews

Friday, July 22, 2011

Bible Acrostics

Groovy
Out-smoking
Dude

Resourceful
Outspoken
Militant empire exacting their
Absolute philosophy over all other
Neophyte
Societies

Priest
Apostle
Unique
Lecturer

Jewish rabbi
Erudite
Scholar
Unwavering
Spirited son.

Monday, July 11, 2011

Writing a True Novel

Writing a true novel is like dueling with a cockroach; penetrating and exploring the past could get real messy. Don’t kid yourself if there is anything else you can think of to do, go ahead and do it. It involves a truckload of continence and revision.

You begin by dreaming about the past, sorting through old pictures and searching for and actually finding old friends, who you later discover were better left in the dark.

You set your scene; research the town you grew up in and thought you knew. Lots of surprises await your discovery under the dusty covers. Then you get to pick which roads to go down and which ones to pass up. It requires enormous energy and creativity; buckets of right and wrong decisions line up for inspection. Old issues march up to, and then parade-rest at your door. Closure takes on a higher meaning, something akin to, should I tell them about the implant, and which one?

Who is your audience? Why should they care? Can anything human relate? Or should you save the paper for puppy training? Why now, have you achieved enlightenment? Who will it hurt or help? Precious time is spent writing poems, honey-do and shopping lists, feeding the dogs, and taking pictures of cloud formations. You spend an inordinate amount of time reading other inspired memoirs and novels, and spending time with the grandkids, anything but writing that damn book…

But wait there’s more, you have to get your facts straight, no embellishing to make it more interesting; names need to be correctly spelled and a time frame established. Trust only a handful of your friends to read and critique. Don’t post online if you want to publish a chapter elsewhere. Take all advice with two aspirin and try not to get confused; one chapter at a time. Find a group meeting and stick with it.

Don’t forget about Aunt So and So, who worked at the Library and discovered the cure for that deadly virus, or the Uncle who won the bronze in Seoul, or the neighbor from next door who died of Cancer because family and friends will get mad at you if you leave them out.

Show them, describe using all the senses, make it colorful, who was popular, what music was playing on the radio and what did you wear. Sprinkle in some dialogue with a dash of character. Pack a punch, leave them wanting more and don’t solve all your characters’ problems; your next blockbuster is wheezing in the wings.




Friday, July 8, 2011

Giant Tag


We tackled the beach
dodging Man ‘o War jelly’s
tagging Big foot’s mark.

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Jellyfish




















The straggler popped, cracked beneath my heel
resembling light blue bubble gum
startling me from my daydream.
I looked down in dismay.
Would that bubble sting
or would it just
flatten blue
burn the
sand.

*Nonet--A nonet has nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etc... until line nine that finishes with just one syllable. It can be on any subject and rhyming is optional.

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